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How to create Windows 10 System Restore point [tutorial]

Although a lot of #Windows10 problems can be fixed by tweaking some software settings, others may require more drastic solutions. One such drastic solution can be restoring from a previous checkpoint created by System Restore.

Before we proceed to the main topic though, we would like to remind you that we accept requests for assistance regarding their Windows computers. If you have a problem that you can’t seem to find a solution to, send us your issue by following the link at the bottom of this page. Just remember, windows problems can sometimes be difficult to diagnose so kindly make sure that you give us very detailed description of the problem. You want to mention relevant history that may have led to the issue. The more information that you can provide, the higher the chance of us diagnosing the issue more efficiently. We also expect that you mention whatever troubleshooting step/s that you may have done before contacting us in order to prevent repeating them in our article. Again, the more details you can give us, the faster it is for us to pinpoint the cause and its corresponding solution.


How does System Restore works?

Every time you do some drastic changes to the software like install a new program, uninstall an app, install a new operating system update, Windows takes note of it. If the change is significant enough to trigger System Restore, a restore point will then be created. A restore point is essentially the state of the software before the change was implemented. Once a restore point has been created, it is saved to your hard drive and Windows will access it if you tells it to in the future. In case you’ll encounter problems in the future and basic troubleshooting can’t seem to fix them, you can simply restore Windows to a particular restore point.

How to turn on System Restore in Windows 10

Microsoft turns off System Restore feature in their Windows 10 operating system by default. In order to use it, you need to enable it first. This is done easily by doing the following steps:

  1. Click on the Start button to open the Start menu.
  2. Type in Create a restore point to search for it.
  3. If the search result pulls up System Properties, click it.
  4. Under Protection Settings,” select the main system drive.
  5. Click the Configure button.
  6. Select the Turn on system protection option. In the same screen, you can also manually change the amount of storage space System Restore can use. By default, only 1% of your drive is allocated for use by System Restore.
  7. Click Apply.
  8. Click OK.

Once you’ve enable System Restore, your Windows 10 machine will then start to create a restore point, also called a checkpoint, on its own if it detects system changes. These checkpoints can sometimes consume the allocated space for System Restore so if you want to manually create a restore point yourself, and there’s not enough storage space for it, you can simply go back to the same page above and delete a checkpoint.

If you happen to have several hard drives in your computer, not all of them can have the System Restore enabled. Generally, you can only turn on System Restore in the drive where your operating system resides.

How to create a Windows 10 System Restore point

Now that you’ve turned on System Restore, the next step that you want to do is to create a System Restore point on your own. Here’s how:

  1. Click on the Start button to open the Start menu.
  2. Type in Create a restore point to search for it.
  3. If the search result pulls up System Properties, click it.
  4. Under Protection Settings,” select the main system drive.
  5. Click the Create button.
  6. Name the restore point. Make sure to include markers to identify it like the date, year or time when it was created. This will make it easy for you to remember which point to use later on. If you’re planning to test a new program and you’re not sure how it will work in your machine, entering a description that indicates said app should be a good cue.
  7. Click Create.

How to undo system changes by using Windows 10 restore point

If you encounter issues and you want to roll back to the previous state of your operating system, here’s how to use that saved restore point:

  1. Click on the Start button to open the Start menu.
  2. Type in Create a restore point to search for it.
  3. If the search result pulls up System Properties, click it.
  4. Click the System Restore button.
  5. Click Next.
  6. Pick the restore point you want.
  7. Click the Scan for affected programs button to see the applications that will be removed if they’re installed after the restore point was created.
  8. Click Close.
  9. Click Next.
  10. Click Finish.

It may take some time roll the operating system back to its previous state so just wait for it.

How to use Restore point if Windows won’t boot up

One of the practical uses of System Restore is to help in fixing No Boot issue in your machine. While the steps on setting up and using System Restore above are done when you still have full operating system/ desktop access, there may be a time when you need to use it if Windows won’t load at all.

One of the problems that can happen in a computer is failure to boot Windows operating system. It may be caused by a third party program or whatever. If you find your machine having hard time loading Windows, follow these steps to access System Restore and fix the problem.

  1. Try to reboot your PC three times to trigger automatic on Windows 10.
  2. Click on Advanced Startup.
  3. Click on Troubleshoot.
  4. Click on Advanced options.
  5. Click on System Restore.
  6. Click Next.
  7. Pick the restore point you want.
  8. Click the Scan for affected programs button to see the applications that will be removed if they’re installed after the restore point was created.
  9. Click Close.
  10. Click Next.
  11. Click Finish.

 


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